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Nicholas Adrian Barr (1943–)

  • Stuart AstillEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

Astill presents Nicholas Barr’s contributions as an academic, his policy work and its influence in the UK and across the world. Barr created an economics of the welfare state, drawing on, among other things, the new economics of information. He established the efficiency role of the welfare state to go far beyond the existing rationale of market failure correction. Barr brings clarity to the controversial economics of higher education finance, presenting the mechanisms at work as transfers of consumption across an individual’s life cycle that mirrors pensions, but recognising the wider systemic failures of choice and access. Finally, with Peter Diamond, Barr explodes myths about pensions and reconstructs the economic analysis space with a pragmatic focus on design issues.

Keywords

Economic theory Economic policy Pension reform Welfare state Higher education Social policy Transition economies 

References

Main Works by Nicholas Barr

  1. Barnes, J. and N. Barr (1988). Strategies for Higher Education: The Alternative White Paper. Edinburgh: Aberdeen University Press, for The David Hume Institute, and London: The Suntory-Toyota International Centres for Economics and Related Disciplines, London School of Economics.Google Scholar
  2. Barr, N. (1979). ‘Myths My Grandpa Taught Me’. Three Banks Review, 124(December): 27–55. Reprinted as Chapter 6 in N. Barr (ed.) (2001) Economic Theory and the Welfare State: Volume II: Income Transfers. Cheltenham: Edward Elgar: 83–111.Google Scholar
  3. Barr, N. (1987). The Economics of the Welfare State. First edition. London: Weidenfeld & Nicolson and Stanford University Press.Google Scholar
  4. Barr, N. (1988a). ‘Student Loans Made Easy’. The Times, 28(July): 12.Google Scholar
  5. Barr, N. (1988b). ‘Student Loans: Disentangling the Myths of the White Paper’. Financial Times, 16(November): 29.Google Scholar
  6. Barr, N. (1989). Student Loans: The Next Steps. Edinburgh: Aberdeen University Press, for The David Hume Institute, and London: The Suntory-Toyota International Centres for Economics and Related Disciplines, London School of Economics.Google Scholar
  7. Barr, N. (1992). The Economics of the Welfare State. Second edition. London: Weidenfeld & Nicolson and Stanford: Stanford University Press.Google Scholar
  8. Barr, N. (ed.) (1994). Labor Markets and Social Policy in Central and Eastern Europe: The Transition and Beyond. Washington, D.C.: World Bank.Google Scholar
  9. Barr, N. (1998). The Economics of the Welfare State. Third edition. Oxford: Oxford University Press and Stanford: Stanford University Press.Google Scholar
  10. Barr, N. (2000). ‘The History of the Phillips Machine’. Chapter 11 in R. Leeson (ed.) A.W.H. Phillips: Collected Works in Contemporary Perspective. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press: 89–114.Google Scholar
  11. Barr, N. (2001). The Welfare State as Piggy Bank: Information, Risk, Uncertainty, and the Role of the State. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  12. Barr, N. (2002). ‘Reforming Pensions: Myths, Truths, and Policy Choices’. International Social Security Review, 55(2): 3–36.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Barr, N. (2004a). The Economics of the Welfare State. Fourth edition. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  14. Barr, N. (2004b). ‘Obituary: Iain Crawford’. The Guardian. Available at: https://www.theguardian.com/education/obituary/comment/0,,1176825,00.html.
  15. Barr, N. (2012a). The Economics of the Welfare State. Fifth edition. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  16. Barr, N. (2012b). ‘The Higher Education White Paper: The Good, the Bad, the Unspeakable—And the Next White Paper’. Social Policy and Administration, 46(5): 483–508.Google Scholar
  17. Barr, N. (2014). ‘Gearty Grilling: Nick Barr on Tuition Fees’. Available at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qzvGn-jfcuA.
  18. Barr, N. (2016a). ‘Milton Friedman and the Finance of Higher Education’. Chapter 23 in R.A. Cord and J.D. Hammond (eds) Milton Friedman: Contributions to Economics and Public Policy. Oxford: Oxford University Press: 436–463.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. Barr, N. (2016b). ‘Dear Friends, This Is Why I Will Vote Remain in the Referendum’. Available at: http://blogs.lse.ac.uk/brexit/2016/05/27/dear-friends-this-is-why-i-will-vote-remain-in-the-referendum.
  20. Barr, N. (2017). ‘Funding Post-compulsory Education’. Chapter 16 in G. Johnes, J. Johnes, T. Agasisti and L. López-Torres (eds) Handbook of Contemporary Education Economics. Cheltenham: Edward Elgar: 357–380.Google Scholar
  21. Barr, N. and I. Crawford (1998). ‘The Dearing Report and the Government’s Response: A Critique’. Political Quarterly, 69(1): 72–84. Reprinted as part of Chapter 10 in N. Barr and I. Crawford (2005) Financing Higher Education: Answers from the UK. London and New York: Routledge: 169–184.Google Scholar
  22. Barr, N. and P. Diamond (2008). Reforming Pensions: Principles and Policy Choices. New York and Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  23. Barr, N. and P. Diamond (2009). ‘Reforming Pensions: Principles, Analytical Errors and Policy Directions’. International Social Security Review, 62(2): 5–29.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. Barr, N. and P. Diamond (2010a). Pension Reform: A Short Guide. New York and Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  25. Barr, N. and P. Diamond (2010b). ‘Reforming Pensions: Lessons from Economic Theory and Some Policy Directions’. Economía, 11(1): 1–14.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  26. Barr, N. and P. Diamond (2016). ‘Reforming Pensions in Chile’. Polityka Społeczna, 1(12): 4–8.Google Scholar
  27. Barr, N. and P. Diamond (2017). Designing a Default Structure: Submission to the Inquiry into Superannuation: Assessing Efficiency and Competitiveness. Australian Government Productivity Commission. Available at: http://www.pc.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0015/221703/sub074-superannuation-assessment.pdf.
  28. Barr, N. and P. Diamond (forthcoming). Pension Design. New York and Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  29. Barr, N., S.R. James and A.R. Prest (1977). Self-Assessment for Income Tax. London: Heinemann.Google Scholar
  30. Prest, A.R. and N. Barr (1979). Public Finance in Theory and Practice. Sixth edition. London: Weidenfeld & Nicolson.Google Scholar
  31. Prest, A.R. and N. Barr (1985). Public Finance in Theory and Practice. Seventh edition. London: Weidenfeld & Nicolson.Google Scholar

Other Works Referred To

  1. Arrow, K.J., B.D. Bernheim, M.S. Feldstein, D.L. McFadden, J.M. Poterba and R.M. Solow (2011). ‘100 Years of the American Economic Review: The Top 20 Articles’. American Economic Review, 101(1): 1–8.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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  6. Friedman, M. (1955). ‘The Role of Government in Education’. Chapter 9 in R.A. Solo (ed.) Economics and the Public Interest. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press: 123–144.Google Scholar
  7. Friedman, M. and S. Kuznets (1945). Income from Independent Professional Practice. New York: National Bureau of Economic Research.Google Scholar
  8. Heald, D. (1988). ‘Review of The Economics of the Welfare State, by N. Barr’. Economic Journal, 98(392): 871-872.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Holzmann, R. and R. Hinz (2005). Old Age Income Support in the 21st Century: An International Perspective on Pension Systems and Reform. Washington, D.C.: World Bank.Google Scholar
  10. Knight, F.H. (1921). Risk, Uncertainty and Profit. Boston and New York: Houghton Mifflin Company.Google Scholar
  11. LSE (2014). ‘Nicholas Barr Remembers Bill Phillips’. Available at: http://blogs.lse.ac.uk/lsehistory/2014/11/18/nicholas-barr-remembers-bill-phillips.
  12. LSE (2016b). ‘@LSEnews on twitter.com’. 8.38am, 6 June.Google Scholar
  13. MacLeod, D. (2003). ‘Myth or Magic?’. The Guardian. Available at: https://www.theguardian.com/education/2003/dec/02/highereducation.tuitionfees.
  14. Nobel Prize Committee (2001). ‘George A. Akerlof, A. Michael Spence, Joseph E. Stiglitz: Markets with Asymmetric Information’. Nobel Prize in Economics Documents 2001–2002, Nobel Prize Committee. Available at: https://ideas.repec.org/p/ris/nobelp/2001_002.html.
  15. Patterson, W. (1995). ‘A Credit to the Bank’. The Times Higher Education Supplement, 20 (January): 22.Google Scholar
  16. Plotnick, R.D. (1988). ‘Review of The Economics of the Welfare State, by N. Barr’. Journal of Economic Literature, 26(4): 1750–1751.Google Scholar
  17. Powell, M. (2017). ‘Social Policy’s “Greatest Hits”’. Social Policy & Administration. Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/spol.12341/abstract.
  18. World Bank (2006). Pension Reform and the Development of Pension Systems: An Evaluation of World Bank Assistance. Washington, D.C.: Independent Evaluation Group. Available at: http://lnweb90.worldbank.org/oed/oeddoclib.nsf/DocUNIDViewForJavaSearch/43B436DFBB2723D085257108005F6309/$file/pensions_evaluation.pdf.

Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Government, London School of EconomicsUniversity of LondonLondonUK

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