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Chapter 4.3: Hopes About the Future of Bakhtinian Pedagogy and Dialogic Research

  • Eugene MatusovEmail author
  • Ana Marjanovic-Shane
  • Mikhail Gradovski
Chapter

Abstract

In this chapter we discuss our hopes for Bakhtinian pedagogy. We hope for deepening Bakhtinian pedagogies through critical dialogues based on disagreements and for securing the societal freedoms and rights for teachers’ authorial pedagogies and learners’ authorial education, both Bakhtinian and non-Bakhtinian, which can be highly diverse and even unique. Our hopes for deepening Bakhtinian pedagogies and freedoms are rooted in the focus of many Bakhtinian pedagogies on deepening meaning making and authorship rather than on the rhizomic survivals or viral proliferations of some patterns (Gregory, Unearthing the tubers and shoots of thought, talk, and praxis: A historiography of classroom discourse in theory and practice (PhD thesis). Columbia University, New York, 2018). We view our book as a contribution for deepening Bakhtinian pedagogy and justifying academic freedoms and rights for authorial pedagogies and education. We discuss our five big hopes for Bakhtinian pedagogy that involve issues of diversification and experimentation, creating professional reflective networks, promoting educational philosophy pluralism, considering the institutionalization of Bakhtinian pedagogy, and, finally, envisioning favorable economic conditions for Bakhtinian pedagogy.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Eugene Matusov
    • 1
    Email author
  • Ana Marjanovic-Shane
    • 2
  • Mikhail Gradovski
    • 3
  1. 1.School of EducationUniversity of DelawareNewarkUSA
  2. 2.Independent ScholarPhiladelphiaUSA
  3. 3.University of StavangerStavangerNorway

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