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Urban Literacies and Processes of Supralocalisation: A Historical Sociolinguistic Perspective

  • Anita Auer
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter takes a historical sociolinguistic perspective on supralocalisation processes in the development of written Standard English by focusing on urban literacies in selected regional centres during the period 1560–1760. More precisely, a case study based on An Electronic Text Edition of Depositions (Kytö et al., Testifying to language and life in Early Modern England. Including a CD-ROM containing an electronic text edition of depositions 1560–1760 (ETED). John Benjamins, Amsterdam, 2011) traces the development of the present indicative third-person singular variable in depositions from the cities of Durham and Lancaster (north), Norwich (East Anglia) and London (south). This allows us to shed light on the occurrence and development of the –s variant (and its competitors) in written English over a period of 200 years.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Anita Auer
    • 1
  1. 1.University of LausanneLausanneSwitzerland

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