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Mathematical Inqueery

  • Kai Rands
Chapter
Part of the Queer Studies and Education book series (QSTED)

Abstract

Mathematical inqueery, drawing on queer theory, interrogates the “regimes of the normal” (Warner, The trouble with normal: Sex, politics, and the ethics of queer life. New York: The Free Press, 1993) in mathematics and mathematics education. It is not merely the inclusion of queer students and issues into the curriculum, but instead consists of questioning the tasks, strategies, and ways of thinking about and doing mathematics. In this chapter, the author discusses some of the ways queering mathematics and mathematics pedagogy have been taken up in the author’s teaching and scholarship such as by queering geometry, mathematical rhetoric/argumentation, and time.

Keywords

Mathematics Education Hate Crime Collective Identity Umbrella Term Critical Race Theory 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kai Rands
    • 1
  1. 1.Independent ScholarChapel HillUSA

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