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Public Health Surveillance: A Vital Alert and Response Function

  • Kumnuan Ungchusak
  • David Heymann
  • Marjorie Pollack
Chapter

Abstract

Ungchusak, Heymann and Pollack address the critical global issue of public health surveillance. They describe how epidemiologists collect and use surveillance data to detect unusual events or outbreaks and to guide control programmes. Drawing on their combined international experience, the authors explain the vital role that data play in alerting authorities to respond to outbreaks such as Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome, Ebola, Zika virus and Avian influenza. They point to the importance of sharing information globally while ensuring equal benefits to providers of data, coordinating surveillance activities across sectors, building capacity for surveillance and coordinating national surveillance activities. The authors emphasise the need for enhanced global cooperation to prepare for future public health emergencies of international concern.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kumnuan Ungchusak
    • 1
  • David Heymann
    • 2
  • Marjorie Pollack
    • 3
  1. 1.Thai Health Promotion FoundationBangkokThailand
  2. 2.London School of Hygiene and Tropical MedicineLondonUK
  3. 3.ProMED-mail, International Society of Infectious DiseasesBrooklineUSA

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