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What Is Philosophical Dialogue?

  • S. Montgomery EwegenEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

Through a close reading of a number of Platonic dialogues—namely, the Cratylus, the Gorgias, the Theaetetus, and the Apology—this chapter sheds light upon the event of philosophical dialogue, as well as upon the literary genre that shares its name.

Keywords

Plato Genre Polyphony Ignorance Perspectives 

Bibliography

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Trinity CollegeHartfordUSA

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