Chapter 1.3: Pedagogic Challenges to the Hegemony of Neo-liberal Business and Management Teaching

  • Tony Bennett
Chapter

Abstract

The aim of this paper is to propose a critical pedagogic conceptual framework to test and counter the hegemony of conventional business and management teaching. Not that we abandon the conventions of mainstream learning objectives. Accounting, marketing and management as good practice, for instance, are all key skills successfully utilised in all organisations. Rather it proposes a model to enlighten students, and teachers, to the alternative ways of viewing the ‘received wisdom’ that seems to dominate our discipline.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tony Bennett
    • 1
  1. 1.Sheffield Business SchoolSheffield Hallam UniversityPrestonUK

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