Chapter 3.6: Teaching for Transformation: Higher Education Institutions, Critical Pedagogy and Social Impact

  • Jean McEwan-Short
  • Victoria Jupp Kina
Chapter

Abstract

Within British academia there is now an argument to engage ‘beyond the journal article’ (Pain et al. 2011); that higher education institutions have a role within social, economic and political development. This is a view that has now been formalised through the introduction of the research assessment category of ‘demonstrable benefits to the wider economy and society’ (HEFCE 2015) Embracing Freirean approaches; we use participatory methods to critically appraise the role of higher education in social transformation. Building on individual experiences we will then develop a collective vision and pathway for moving beyond ‘impact’ and towards collective transformation.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jean McEwan-Short
    • 1
  • Victoria Jupp Kina
    • 1
  1. 1.University of DundeeDundeeUK

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