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Minority Languages and Social Media

  • Daniel CunliffeEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

Cunliffe provides a detailed overview of the current understanding of the relationship between social media and minority language maintenance and revitalisation. The chapter begins by discussing digital language vitality and the role of social media in digital ascent. It then considers the extent to which social media provide permissive environments for minority language use and the ways in which formal and informal language policy may serve to enhance or restrict this. A discussion follows on the factors that influence the language behaviours of minority language speakers on social media and the potential impact of social media on the minority language itself. Recognising the critical role of the social network in shaping language behaviour on social media, the chapter then examines approaches aimed at creating social networks between minority language speakers and concludes by considering geo-spatial analysis of social media data.

Keywords

Social media Language maintenance and revitalisation Digital language vitality Language policy Social networks 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Computing and Mathematics, Faculty of Computing, Engineering and ScienceUniversity of South WalesPontypriddUK

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