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Minority Language Media: Issues of Power, Finance and Organization

  • Tom Moring
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter explores the challenges that digital media pose to minority languages. It presents examples of how international and national policies are applied and how the daily life of national minorities in Europe is affected. A major concern is the fundamental change in public and private life as services and consumption are increasingly carried out on digital platforms. Developments towards individualized forms of media use in an open market reduce the power of established policies in support of minority languages. A paradox emerges between individually rewarding multilingual behaviour of minority-language speakers and the aggregated effects on the minority. Against this background the chapter also takes issue with existing forms of financing and organization of media services for, of and on minority language communities.

Keywords

Minority language media Digital platforms Financing and organization of media services International and national policies Multilingual behaviour 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tom Moring
    • 1
  1. 1.Swedish School of Social ScienceUniversity of HelsinkiHelsinkiFinland

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