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Teachers and the Teaching Profession: Autonomy, Regulation and Expertise

  • Christine FordeEmail author
  • Margery McMahon
Chapter

Abstract

The relationship between expertise and understandings of teacher professionalism is considered. The balance between the autonomy and regulation of both teachers and the teaching profession is discussed. Consideration is then given to how different constructions of teacher professionalism may impede or foster teacher expertise. Two binaries are examined: ‘old’ and ‘new’ professionalism and ‘occupational’ and organisational’ professionalism alongside recent calls for reprofessionalisation. The role of teacher organisations, specifically teacher unions and professional councils is discussed. Both types of organisations are positioned as the ‘voice of the profession’ and potentially contribute to teacher development and the recognition of teacher expertise.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of EducationUniversity of GlasgowGlasgowUK

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