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The Question of Teacher Quality

  • Christine FordeEmail author
  • Margery McMahon
Chapter

Abstract

The key concepts of the book are introduced—professionalism, professional learning and teacher expertise. A survey of teacher policy in the UK and NI in early 2000s provides a backdrop to the discussion of the drivers of teacher policy currently. The chapter considers the way in which national teacher policy interventions are shaped by international comparisons and in particular the role of the OECD and the International Summit on the Teaching Profession. The chapter concludes by arguing that in order to improve teacher quality and develop accomplished practice we need to enhance teacher expertise through career-long professional learning.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of EducationUniversity of GlasgowGlasgowUK

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