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Doing Indigenous Family

  • Maggie Walter
Chapter

Abstract

Even the limited Australian literature concludes that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples do not “do” family within normalised Euro-Australian parameters. There are subtle but important culturally informed differences in family structures, arrangements, practices and values. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families are more likely to be sole parent households, though they also often include another significant adult. Parents also hold specific views on what the most important values for their children to learn at home are. This chapter uses data from LSIC Waves 1–6 to map how factors of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander family life manifest in the lives of the children of the LSIC households.

Keywords

Torres Strait Islander Relative Isolation Extend Family Member Parenting Efficacy Neighbourhood Problem 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Maggie Walter
    • 1
  1. 1.University of TasmaniaSandy BayAustralia

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