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Luxemburg and Lenin

  • Peter HudisEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

Rosa Luxemburg and Lenin represent distinct approaches to revolutionary transformation, and these differences have become of increasing importance in light of the failure of numerous revolutions since 1917 to avoid succumbing to bureaucratic and authoritarian dictatorships. Although many presume that the divide between the two centers on matters of organization, a careful study of their work shows that this was less decisive than is often claimed, since they also shared many common approaches to the issue. The question that truly demarcates Luxemburg’s legacy from Lenin’s concerns what happens after the revolutionary seizure of power. This is most powerfully seen in her writings on revolutionary democracy and the critique of Lenin in ‘The Russian Revolution.’

Keywords

Luxemburg Lenin Organization Revolution Democracy Dictatorship Nationalism 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Humanities and PhilosophyOakton Community CollegeDes PlainesUSA

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