Coping with Institutional Challenges for Arctic Environmental Governance

  • Christoph Humrich
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter explores new avenues for the analysis of the Arctic Council as a pre-eminent forum in a globally embedded and embedding regional space. The author focuses on the fragmentation of Arctic environmental governance and asks which functions the Arctic Council would need to perform in order to actively and effectively manage institutional interplay. These tasks comprise commitment, collaboration, coordination, cooperation, compliance, and controlling. Based on these functional tasks, the chapter zooms in on the institutional challenges for the Arctic Council with regard to the inclusion of actors, integration of issue areas, and information provision about policy implementation and impact.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Christoph Humrich
    • 1
  1. 1.Department for International Relations and International OrganizationUniversity of GroningenGroningenNetherlands

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