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Francophone Gothic Melodramas

  • Bill Marshall
Chapter

Abstract

Marshall discusses the important but under-researched corpus of francophone literature written in the nineteenth century in Louisiana. Focusing on the literary life of New Orleans, he pinpoints French-Atlantic influences which shape authors’ responses to the political tumult and racial tensions of the epoch. Locating adjacencies with melodrama and Romanticism which characterise the gothic elements of this output, he leads the reader to four key motifs—the house, skin, capitalism and the Jew, and blood—and discusses their treatment by Victor Séjour, Alfred Mercier, and Sidonie de la Houssaye.

Keywords

Yellow Fever Short Story French Revolution Literary Corpus Unconscious Mind 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© The Editor(s) (if applicable) and The Author(s) 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bill Marshall
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.University of StirlingStirlingUK
  2. 2.Institute of Modern Languages ResearchUniversity of LondonLondonUK

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