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Phonology in Language Learning

  • Martha C. Pennington
  • Pamela Rogerson-Revell
Chapter
Part of the Research and Practice in Applied Linguistics book series (RPAL)

Abstract

Understanding how learners acquire language, particularly pronunciation, can help sensitize pronunciation teachers and researchers to potential problem areas for students which may require remediation or signal a focus for further research. L1 acquisition is a lengthy process of learning to perceive and produce the elements of a language, including its individual sounds and sound patterns, while also learning to communicate with other people. Learners evolve a linguistic base for perception and production of speech which will be the starting point for all further language learning. Besides L1 transfer, individual differences in aptitude, personality, and motivation are an important factor accounting for differences in pronunciation outcomes. A further important factor is the explicit learning strategies which L2 learners use in their attempts to acquire pronunciation skills.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Martha C. Pennington
    • 1
  • Pamela Rogerson-Revell
    • 2
  1. 1.SOAS and Birkbeck CollegeUniversity of LondonLondonUK
  2. 2.EnglishUniversity of LeicesterLeicesterUK

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