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Creativity in Materials and Resources

  • Alan Maley
  • Tamas Kiss
Chapter

Abstract

Materials can exhibit creativity through their content and through their processes. Under content we review creative exploitation of visuals, literature, creative writing, storytelling, drama and voice, and translation. Under processes we cite work explicitly aimed at developing creativity among students, and work on specific areas of language, including games, vocabulary and memory. In conclusion we relate these resources to some of the factors already noted in the earlier chapters: bi-sociation, re-framing, noticing, use of heuristics, rich and varied inputs, appeal to the senses and opportunities for imaginative engagement.

Keywords

Content Process Aesthetic Resource Materials Creative 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alan Maley
    • 1
  • Tamas Kiss
    • 2
  1. 1.The C GroupFordwichUK
  2. 2.Xi’an Jiaotong – Liverpool UniversitySuzhouChina

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