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The Evolution of the Exploratory Practice Framework

  • Judith Hanks
Chapter
Part of the Research and Practice in Applied Linguistics book series (RPAL)

Abstract

Exploratory Practice (EP) focuses on quality of life and understanding, but why is this focus so important? What are the philosophical influences that make EP distinctive and why do they matter? This chapter and the following one will address these questions from two perspectives: to trace the history of the development of the EP principles, showing their philosophical, theoretical, and pedagogical ancestry, and, importantly, to comprehend the importance of profound understanding for EP and for the field. As Allwright maintains:

Keywords

Teacher Educator Reflective Practice Novice Teacher Language Teacher Practitioner Research 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© The Author(s) 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Judith Hanks
    • 1
  1. 1.University of LeedsLeedsUK

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