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Process and Outcomes: Participation and Empowerment in a Multidimensional Poverty Framework

  • Shailaja Fennell
Chapter
Part of the Rethinking International Development series book series (RID)

Abstract

In this chapter, Shailaja Fennell considers the capability, livelihoods, and chronic poverty approaches to development—all of which recognise the importance of participation processes and empowerment outcomes for escaping poverty. But as Fennell points out, there is no common methodological base for incorporating participation and evaluating empowerment in order to measure poverty reduction. Recent innovations in multidimensional poverty measurement, however, provide insight. In particular, an evaluation of new methodologies for researching poverty shows that participation does not automatically improve well-being. To illustrate, Fennell draws on data from a mixed methods approach that investigated the educational outcomes of the poor to show how an explicit incorporation of the perceptions of the poor provides a way forward in linking empowerment to capabilities. The possibility of using community-based research that works with the actions and perceptions of the poor in contexts that are sharply divided by power hierarchies is crucial for improving our understanding of the relation between participation and empowerment.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Shailaja Fennell
    • 1
  1. 1.Centre of Development Studies and Fellow of Jesus CollegeUniversity of CambridgeCambridgeUK

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