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Epibiosis

Ecology, Effects and Defences

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Marine Hard Bottom Communities

Part of the book series: Ecological Studies ((ECOLSTUD,volume 206))

Abstract

Hard substratum for attachment may easily become a limited resource in the marine environment because the density of the medium requires attachment for a stationary life and allows attachment because water transports all the required resources for sessile organisms. As a consequences, also the body surfaces of living organisms may become colonized by epibionts. This typically aquatic life form is described, as well as the consequences of such an association for the partners, and the possible defence mechanisms of the substratum organisms.

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Wahl, M. (2009). Epibiosis. In: Wahl, M. (eds) Marine Hard Bottom Communities. Ecological Studies, vol 206. Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg. https://doi.org/10.1007/b76710_4

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