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Reconciling data flow machines and conventional languages

  • Arthur H. Veen
Programming Languages Which Support Parallelism
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 111)

Abstract

This paper discusses the problems that arise when programs written in a conventional language are to be compiled into machine code for a data flow machine. It describes the current state of a project aimed at developing a compiler for an existing high level language for string processing. The compiler is intended to accept the full language without changing its semantics in any respect. The implementation of a sizable subset of the language is described and solutions to the remaining problems are suggested. The results indicate that the gap between data flow machines and conventional languages is easier to bridge than previously assumed.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • Arthur H. Veen
    • 1
  1. 1.Mathematical CentreAmsterdamThe Netherlands

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