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Using enzymes in pulp bleaching: Mill applications

  • J. S. Tolan
  • M. Guenette
Chapter
Part of the Advances in Biochemical Engineering/Biotechnology book series (ABE, volume 57)

Abstract

Xylanase enzymes have proven to be a cost-effective way for mills to realize a variety of bleaching benefits, including: reducing or eliminating Cl2 use, decreasing AOX discharges, freeing up chlorine dioxide generating capacity, or increasing the bleached brightness ceiling—without expensive capital investments. These benefits are achieved over the long term when the enzymes are selected and applied properly in the mill. Chapter 7 described the chemistry of hemicellulase action on pulp. This chapter describes the industrial benefits of xylanase enzyme treatment and the issues that must be considered to get the most benefit from using xylanase treatment in a mill.

Keywords

Enzyme Treatment Kappa Number Chlorine Dioxide Filter Paper Activity Pulp Bleaching 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. S. Tolan
    • 1
  • M. Guenette
    • 1
  1. 1.Research Manager and late Research Associate, logen CorporationOttawaCanada

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