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Indexed memory as a generic protocol for handling vectors of data in genetic programming

  • Ik Soo Lim
  • Daniel Thalmann
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 1498)

Abstract

Indexed memory is used as a generic protocol for handling vectors of data in genetic programming. Using this simple method, a single program can generate many outputs. It eliminates the complexity of maintaining different trees for each desired parameter and avoids problem-specific function calls for handling the vectors. This allows a single set of programming language primitives applicable to wider range of problems. For a test case, the technique is applied to evolution of behavioural control programs for a simulated 2d vehicle in a corridor following problem.

Keywords

Genetic Programming Memory Location Sensor Reading Generic Protocol Motion Controller 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ik Soo Lim
    • 1
  • Daniel Thalmann
    • 1
  1. 1.LIG, Department of Computer ScienceSwiss Federal Institute of Technology (EPFL)LausanneSwitzerland

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