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Categorizing case-base maintenance: Dimensions and directions

  • David B. Leake
  • David C. Wilson
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 1488)

Abstract

Experience with the growing number of large-scale CBR systems has led to increasing recognition of the importance of case-base maintenance. Multiple researchers have addressed pieces of the case-base maintenance problem, considering such issues as maintaining consistency and controlling case-base growth. However, despite the existence of these cases of case-base maintenance, there is no general framework of dimensions for describing case-base maintenance systems. Such a framework would be useful both to understand the state of the art in case-base maintenance and to suggest new avenues of exploration by identifying points along the dimensions that have not yet been studied. This paper presents a first attempt at identifying the dimensions of case-base maintenance. It shows that characterizations along such dimensions can suggest avenues for future case-base maintenance research and presents initial steps exploring one of those avenues: identifying patterns of problems that require generalized revisions and addressing them with lazy updating.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • David B. Leake
    • 1
  • David C. Wilson
    • 1
  1. 1.Computer Science DepartmentIndiana UniversityBloomingtonUSA

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