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Bertrand Russell, Herbrand’s theorem, and the assignment statement

  • Melvin Fitting
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 1476)

Abstract

While propositional modal logic is a standard tool, first-order modal logic is not. Indeed, it is not generally understood that conventional first-order syntax is insufficiently expressible. In this paper we sketch a natural syntax and semantics for first-order modal logic, and show how it easily copes with well-known problems. And we provide formal tableau proof rules to go with the semantics, rules that are, at least in principle, automatable.

Keywords

Modal Logic Free Variable Classical Logic Assignment Statement Definite Description 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Melvin Fitting
    • 1
  1. 1.Dept. Mathematics and Computer ScienceLehman College (CUNY)Bronx

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