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A formal treatment of remotely keyed encryption

Extended abstract
  • Matt Blaze
  • Joan Feigenbaum
  • Moni Naor
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 1403)

Abstract

Remotely keyed encryption schemes (RKESs), introduced by Blaze [6], support high-band width cryptographic applications (such as encrypted video conferences) in which long-lived secrets (such as users' private keys) never leave lower-bandwidth environments such as secure smart-cards. We provide a formal framework in which to study the security of RKESs and give an RKES that satisfies our formal security requirements. Our RKES is efficient in that the amount of communication and computation required of the smart-card is independent of the input size. Our proof of security uses the pseudorandom permutation framework of Naor and Reingold [14] in an essential way.

Keywords

Block Ciphers Pseudorandomness Remotely Keyed Encryption Session Keys Smart-cards 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Matt Blaze
    • 1
  • Joan Feigenbaum
    • 1
  • Moni Naor
    • 2
  1. 1.AT&T Labs - ResearchFlorham ParkUSA
  2. 2.Dept. Applied Math. and Computer ScienceWeizmann Institute of ScienceRehovotIsrael

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