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Illustrating anatomic models — A semi-interactive approach

  • Bernhard Preim
  • Alf Ritter
  • Thomas Strothotte
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 1131)

Abstract

We present the Zoom Illustrator which illustrates complex 3D-models for teaching anatomy. Our system is a semi-interactive tool which combines an animation mode and an interactive mode. While the animation mode is suitable for beginners, the interactive mode is dedicated to experienced users. The animation is controlled by scripts specifying what should be explained in which level of detail.

The design of the animation and the interactive components is directed to generate illustrations according to the user's interest. This includes the presentation of text and the parameterization of the rendered image.

Changes on the textual part, interactively requested or generated in an animation, are propagated to the graphics part and vice versa. Thus the display of an explanation results in an adaptation of the corresponding graphical part.

Keywords

Script-Based Animation Interactive Illustrations Emphasis Techniques Image-Text-Relation Fisheye Zoom Techniques 

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bernhard Preim
    • 1
  • Alf Ritter
    • 1
  • Thomas Strothotte
    • 1
  1. 1.Institut für Simulation und GraphikOtto-von-Guericke-Universität MagdeburgMagdeburg

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