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Subjective assessment of a multimedia system for distance learning

  • Athanassios Kokotopoulos
Coded Representation
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 1242)

Abstract

Multimedia is a combination of one or more media that might include text, graphics, animation, voice and video. In this paper we address the question whether subjects are able to assess the perceived quality of a multimedia sequence continuously. To this end the Single Stimulus Continuous Quality Evaluation (SSCQE) technique is utilised. For this method an audiovisual sequence was constructed, coded and used as a proposed multimedia evaluation environment in the context of a remote teaching application. A continuous scale was used and scores were collected continuously using a slider mechanism for the duration of the presentation. Analysis of the results confirms the adequacy of SSCQE methodology for both audio and video quality assessments. There is also some evidence, that subjects were relatively more sensitive to audio impairments in this application.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Athanassios Kokotopoulos
    • 1
  1. 1.University of EssexUSA

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