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A computational approach to situation theory based on logic programming to design cognitive agents

  • Milton Corrêa
  • Sueli Mendes
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 991)

Abstract

This paper describes a framework based on logic programming to provide computational instruments to design cognitive agents and systems in Situation Theory.

This framework provides a representation in Prolog for the Situation Theory objects: individuals, relations, infons, situations, parameters, anchors, types (object types and situation types) and for making inferences by using rules such as “supports” and “constraints”. It provides also two mechanisms for inferences: based upon backward chaining and upon forward chaining. These inferences are situated in a particular or in a general context.

We conclude this paper giving examples of applications of this framework and showing how it can be used as a tool to build agents and systems having Situation Theory as their theoretical basis. We claim that this framework can be easily extended to include induction and belief systems.

Content areas

applications agent-oriented programming situation theory and logic programming 

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Bibliography

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Milton Corrêa
    • 1
  • Sueli Mendes
    • 2
  1. 1.Serpro - Serviço Federal de Processamento de DadosBrasil
  2. 2.Departamento de Enegenharia e Sistemas de Computação COPPE/UFRJBrasil

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