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Modeling intentions with extended logic programming

  • Michael da Costa Móra
  • José Gabriel Lopes
  • Helder Coelho
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 991)

Abstract

As far as we are concerned, the existing theories of intentions adopt a designer's perspective, i.e., intentions and related mental states are approached from a designer's point-of-view. Such theories are logicbased and enable one to reason about the agents. However, they are not adequate to be used by the agent, to reason about itself. We argue that adopting an agent perspective may simplify some aspects of such theories, and enable the definition of a logic that agents may use to reason. Also, this change of perspective raises some questions that are, in general, ignored by traditional theories, namely the relations among other attitudes and intentions and between intentions and actions. We present preliminary definitions of a theory of intentions that adopt this different perspective. We also discuss some of the traditionally ignored questions, unveiling potential extensions to the definitions presented here.

Keywords

theories of intentions mental states modeling event calculus distributed artificial intelligence 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael da Costa Móra
    • 1
    • 2
  • José Gabriel Lopes
    • 2
  • Helder Coelho
    • 3
  1. 1.CPGCC UFRGS/BrazilBrazil
  2. 2.CRIA UNINOVA/PortugalMonte da CaparicaPortugal
  3. 3.INESC/PortugalLisbon

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