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An algebraic temporal logic approach to the forbidden state problem in discrete event control

  • KiamTian Seow
  • R. Devanathan
The Automata Theoretic Approach
Part of the Lecture Notes in Control and Information Sciences book series (LNCIS, volume 199)

Abstract

In this paper, we present an axiomatic approach to the forbidden state problem in discrete event control for a class of concurrent DES using temporal logic. A simple example illustrates the main ideas developed.

Keywords

Temporal Logic Discrete Event Discrete Event System Linear Time Temporal Logic Predicate Transformer 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London Limited 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • KiamTian Seow
    • 1
  • R. Devanathan
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Electrical and Electronic EngineeringNanyang Technological UniversityRepublic of Singapore

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