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Personalities for synthetic actors: Current issues and some perspectives

  • Paolo Petta
  • Robert Trappl
Chapter
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 1195)

Keywords

Synthetic Actor Theater Project Virtual Sensor Drama Theory Virtual Actor 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Paolo Petta
    • 1
    • 2
  • Robert Trappl
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Austrian Research Institute for Artificial IntelligenceVienna
  2. 2.Department of Medical Cybernetics and Artificial IntelligenceUniversity of ViennaVienna

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