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A principle of minimum complexity in evolution

  • Luis R. Lopez
  • H. John Caulfield
Adaptation And Evolution In General
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 496)

Abstract

This paper presents a principle of minimum complexity in evolving systems. Minimum complexity is supported by results and observations from genetic algorithm research and information complexity theory. This paper introduces minimum complexity and presents quantitative evidence for minimum complexity in messy genetic evolution. There also appears to be a strong correlation with our theory and what is observed in biological genetics.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Luis R. Lopez
    • 1
  • H. John Caulfield
    • 2
  1. 1.U.S. Army Strategic Defense Command, Advanced Technology DirectorateHuntsville
  2. 2.Center for Applied OpticsUniversity of Alabama HuntsvilleHuntsvilleAlabama

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