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Knowledge refinement of an expert system using a symbolic-connectionist approach

  • J. Santos
  • D. Lorenzo
  • S. Gomez
  • J. Heras
  • R. P. Otero
Hybrid and Cooperative Systems
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 1211)

Abstract

In this paper we have shown how to solve a real connectionist learning problem with a symbolic interpretation for the refinement of scoring systems and risk evaluation systems. This is a significant issue not easily manageable by classical symbolic methods [1] that are specially oriented to static domains. This has lead us to implement a symbolic-connectionist approach which combines the efficiency of connectionist learning with the comprehensibility of symbolic methods.

The network structure combines a linear part that does the same additions as physicians do to determine the weighted contributions of input variables and a non-linear transformation that determine the punctuation levels. The output units represent the scoring levels and they can be interpreted in a symbolic way. The system is currently validated with more real data, and it is being used to refine the scoring and risk evaluation systems of other hospitals by training the net with a set of local patients.

Keywords

Machine Learning Expert Systems in Medicine Knowledge Refinement Neural Networks 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Santos
    • 1
  • D. Lorenzo
    • 1
  • S. Gomez
    • 1
  • J. Heras
    • 2
  • R. P. Otero
    • 1
  1. 1.Dept. Computatión, Fac. InformáticaUniversidade da CoruñaA CoruñaSpain
  2. 2.Orthopaedic Surgery and Trauma Dpt.Hospital General de GaliciaA CoruñaSpain

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