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The interval skip list: A data structure for finding all intervals that overlap a point

  • Eric N. Hanson
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 519)

Abstract

A problem that arises in computational geometry, pattern matching, and other applications is the need to quickly determine which of a collection of intervals overlap a query point. The interval binary search tree (IBS-tree) has been proposed as a solution to this problem. A recently discovered randomized data structure called the skip list provides functionality and performance similar to balanced binary trees (e.g., AVL-trees), but is much simpler to implement than balanced trees. This paper introduces an extension of the skip list called the interval skip list, or IS-list, to support interval indexing. IS-lists remain dynamicly balanced, and show similar performance to IBS-trees, but can be implemented in about one-fourth as much high-level language code. Searching an IS-list containing n intervals to find intervals overlapping a point takes expected time O(log n+L) where L is the number of matching intervals. Inserting or deleting an mterval takes expected time O(log2n).

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Eric N. Hanson
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.USAF Wright Laboratory WL/AAA-1Dayton
  2. 2.Dept. of Computer ScienceWright State UniversityDayton

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