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Enhancing community and collaboration in the virtual library

  • Rob Procter
  • Andy McKinlay
  • Ana Goldenberg
  • Elisabeth Davenport
  • Peter Burnhill
  • Sheila Cannell
Supporting User Interaction
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 1324)

Abstract

The advent of the virtual library is usually presented as a welcome development for library users. Unfortunately, the emphasis which is often placed upon convenience of access tends to reinforce the perception of the use of information resources as a solitary activity. In fact, information retrieval (IR) in the conventional library is often a highly collaborative activity, involving users' peers and experts such as librarians. Failure in the design of virtual library services to take into account the ways in which physical spaces help engender a sense of community and facilitate collaboration will result in its users being denied timely and effective access to valuable sources of assistance.

We report an investigation of collaboration issues in IR. We begin by defining a generic model of collaboration, and of collaborative spaces. Finally, we describe the design of a prototype multimedia-based system intended to facilitate a sense of community and collaboration between its users.

Keywords

information retrieval collaboration virtual library 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rob Procter
    • 1
  • Andy McKinlay
    • 2
  • Ana Goldenberg
    • 1
  • Elisabeth Davenport
    • 3
  • Peter Burnhill
    • 4
  • Sheila Cannell
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of Computer ScienceEdinburgh UniversityEdinburghScotland
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyEdinburgh UniversityEdinburghScotland
  3. 3.Department of Communication and Information StudiesQueen Margaret CollegeEdinburghScotland
  4. 4.Edinburgh University LibraryEdinburghScotland

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