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Introducing planning in discrete event systems

  • Pedro Cabalar
  • Ramón P. Otero
  • Manuel Cabarcos
  • Alvaro Barreiro
2 Theory and Methods
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 1333)

Abstract

Precedent studies have revealed a strong relationship between discrete events formalisms and formalisms for temporal reasoning in Artificial Intelligence. Both areas typically deal with temporal or dynamic domains, but under different points of view. Discrete events formalisms are intended for the analysis of the represented system, predicting its behavior by simulation. Artificial Intelligence approaches pay special attention to the adequacy of the representation to be used, which usually allows solving also planning problems. This paper is a study on the introduction of planning techniques into the DEVS model, used for modeling of discrete event systems. To this aim, we have chosen a basic representation, the Generalized Magnitudes temporal reasoning formalism, which let us represent a complete DEVS model of a system and simultaneously provides interesting properties for planning. The paper identifies the basic steps that a planning. algorithm should carry out providing also some examples. Finally, it poses possible problems that may appear and establishes the future research lines.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Pedro Cabalar
    • 1
  • Ramón P. Otero
    • 2
  • Manuel Cabarcos
    • 1
  • Alvaro Barreiro
    • 2
  1. 1.Dept. of Computer Languages and SystemsUniversity of VigoSpain
  2. 2.Dept. of Computer ScienceUniversity of CorunnaSpain

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