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Preference logics and nonmonotonicity in logic programming

  • Allen L. BrownJr.
  • Surya Mantha
  • Toshiro Wakayama
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 620)

Abstract

It is claimed that the notion of preference is a fundamental modality in computing and is a generalization of the notion of minimality. A logic of feasible preference is presented. The non-monotonic behavior of negation in logic programming is modeled as a symbolic optimization problem. As a case study, for the class of logic programs with one or more stable models, we give a preferential transformation of logic programs that identifies their stable models as the optimal worlds in the intended model of the corresponding preferential theory. Minimization and minimization orderings are given explicit syntactic representations and their due status in the model theory. Preference logics gives a very elegant model theory for defaults, without any mention of fixpoints. Further, nonmonotonic reasoning is carried out in a monotonic logic, since members of the optimal worlds are not identified with theorems of a preferential theory. Preference logics have great potential to bring the areas of Symbolic Computation, Knowledge Representation and Classical Optimization closer.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Allen L. BrownJr.
    • 1
  • Surya Mantha
    • 1
  • Toshiro Wakayama
    • 1
  1. 1.Webster Research CenterXerox CorporationUSA

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