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CREAM-Tools: An authoring environment for curriculum and course building in an intelligent tutoring system

  • Roger Nkambou
  • Gilles Gauthier
  • Claude Frasson
Authoring and Development Tools and Techniques
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 1108)

Abstract

The main goal of the third stage of the SAFARI project is the delivery by an intelligent tutoring system (ITS) for a complete course. To achieve this goal, a subject-matter model, called CREAM, that can support course generation and delivery has been proposed. The acquisition of such a knowledge model requires to enable the designer with dedicated tools and methods. The purpose of this paper is to present the authoring environment (CREAM-Tools) we developped to support course and curriculum construction using the CREAM approach. This authoring environment consists of a course generation kit, of building tools and methodologies. Curriculums and courses produced with this environment are directly usable by an ITS. We also show ways other modules in an intelligent tutorial system can exploit the resulting curriculums and courses.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Roger Nkambou
    • 1
  • Gilles Gauthier
    • 2
  • Claude Frasson
    • 1
  1. 1.Département d'informatique et de recherche opérationnelleUniversité de MontréalMontréalCanada
  2. 2.Département d'informatiqueUniversité du Québec à MontréalMontréalCanada

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