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LISPO2: A persistent object-oriented lisp

  • Gilles Barbedette
Session 9: Object-Oriented Systems
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 416)

Abstract

Large and complex design applications such as CASE, office automation and knowledge based applications require sophisticated development environments supporting modeling, persistence and evolution of complex objects. This paper presents a brief overview of a persistent object-oriented LISP named LISPO2 combining both language and database facilities. LISPO2 is a Lisp-based environment providing the O2 object-oriented data model extended with the notions of constructor and exception. Persistence is achieved through the use of a persistent name space. These features centered around an interpreter facilitate quick prototyping of applications.

Keywords

Complex Part Exception Handling Class Extension Club Member Object Orient 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gilles Barbedette
    • 1
  1. 1.AltaïrLe Chesnay Cedex

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