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Interaction models and the principled design of interactive systems

  • A. J. Dix
  • M. D. Harrison
  • C. Runciman
  • H. W. Thimbleby
IV — The User Interface
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 289)

Abstract

System design should be controlled by sound engineering principles. We discuss issues concerned with the derivation and formalisation of such principles that may be employed in the construction of specifications of interactive systems and in their validation. We present the state of a research method for the design of interactive systems, which is currently being used and is indeed incorporating user engineering principles into the design process.

Our present discussion focuses on two distinct problems: (1) the derivation of appropriate and effective principles of interaction behaviour; (2) how appropriate formulations of principles may be applied to the design process using mathematical models of interactive behaviour. We also report on the application of these experimental techniques to a realistic example.

Keywords

interaction models user engineering principles interactive system design user-centred design 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. J. Dix
    • 1
  • M. D. Harrison
    • 1
  • C. Runciman
    • 1
  • H. W. Thimbleby
    • 1
  1. 1.Human Computer Interaction Group Department of Computer ScienceUniversity of YorkHeslingtonUK

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