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A classification and synthesis of student modelling techniques in intelligent computer-assisted instruction

  • Julita Vassileva
Student Modeling
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 438)

Abstract

A classification of existing types of student models with a view to their diagnostic capabilities and the domain-dependency of their updating mechanisms is made. We propose a synthesis of known techniques to obtain a model of the student's domain knowledge and a model of his individual features which can be used in a wider class of structured domains.

Keywords

student modelling ITS ICAI 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Julita Vassileva
    • 1
  1. 1.Software Engineering DepartmentInstitute of Mathematics, Bulgarian Academy of SciencesSofiaBulgaria

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