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Color-X Event Model: Integrated specification of the dynamics of individual objects

  • J. F. M. Burg
  • R. P. van de Riet
Behavioural Modeling
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 1021)

Abstract

In this paper we show that specifying the dynamics of a system as a whole requires more information than just the combination of the dynamics of the individual objects of the system. The introduction of yet another additional model, often called something as the object interaction diagram, does not bridge the gap completely. We propose a linguistically based dynamic modeling technique, the Color-X Event Models, which defines the system dynamics in an overall fashion, and from which the individual object dynamics are automatically retrieved. A comparison with existing approaches in dynamic modeling is included.

Keywords

Color-X Event Model Dynamic Model Linguistics CPL Information and Communication Systems Lexicon OMT CASE 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. F. M. Burg
    • 1
  • R. P. van de Riet
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Computer ScienceVrije UniversiteitAmsterdamThe Netherlands

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