The Oz Programming model

Extended abstract
  • Gert Smolka
Keynotes
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 966)

Abstract

The Oz Programming Model (OPM) is a concurrent programming model that subsumes functional and object-oriented programming as facets of a general model. This is particularly interesting for concurrent object-oriented programming, for which no comprehensive and formal model existed until now. There is a conservative extension of OPM providing the problem-solving capabilities of constraint logic programming. OPM has been developed together with a concomitant programming language Oz designed for applications that require complex symbolic representations, organization into multiple agents, and soft real-time control. An efficient, robust, and interactive implementation of Oz is freely available.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    M. Henz, G. Smolka, and J. Würtz. Object-oriented concurrent constraint programming in Oz. In V. Saraswat and P. V. Hentenryck, editors, Principles and Practice of Constraint Programming, chapter 2, pages 27–48. The MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, 1995. To appear.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    J. Jaffar and M. J. Maher. Constraint logic programming: A survey. The Journal of Logic Programming, 19/20:503–582, May–July 1994.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    S. Janson and S. Haridi. Programming paradigms of the Andorra kernel language. In V. Saraswat and K. Ueda, editors, Logic Programming, Proceedings of the 1991 International Symposium, pages 167–186, San Diego, USA, 1991. The MIT Press.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    M. J. Maher. Logic semantics for a class of committed-choice programs. In J.-L. Lassez, editor, Logic Programming, Proceedings of the Fourth International Conference, pages 858–876, Cambridge, MA, 1987. The MIT Press.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    M. Mehl, R. Scheidhauer, and C. Schulte. An abstract machine for Oz. In Proceedings of PLILP'95, Utrecht, The Netherlands, Sept. 1995. LNCS, Springer-Verlag. To appear.Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    R. Milner. A Calculus of Communicating Systems, volume 92 of LNCS. Springer-Verlag, Berlin, Germany, 1980.Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    R. Milner. Functions as processes. Journal of Mathematical Structures in Computer Science, 2(2):119–141, 1992.Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    V. A. Saraswat. Concurrent Constraint Programming. The MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, 1993.Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    C. Schulte and G. Smolka. Encapsulated search in higher-order concurrent constraint programming. In M. Bruynooghe, editor, Logic Programming: Proceedings of the 1994 International Symposium, pages 505–520, Ithaca, New York, USA, 13–17 Nov. 1994. The MIT Press.Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    C. Schulte, G. Smolka, and J. Würtz. Encapsulated search and constraint programming in Oz. In A. Borning, editor, Second Workshop on Principles and Practice of Constraint Programming, Lecture Notes in Computer Science, vol. 874, pages 134–150, Orcas Island, Washington, USA, 2–4 May 1994. Springer-Verlag.Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    E. Shapiro. The family of concurrent logic programming languages. ACM Computing Surveys, 21(3):413–511, Sept. 1989.Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    G. Smolka. A foundation for higher-order concurrent constraint programming. In J.-P. Jouannaud, editor, 1st International Conference on Constraints in Computational Logics, Lecture Notes in Computer Science, vol. 845, pages 50–72, München, Germany, 7–9 Sept. 1994. Springer-Verlag.Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    G. Smolka. The definition of Kernel Oz. In A. Podelski, editor, Constraints: Basics and Trends, volume 910 of Lecture Notes in Computer Science, pages 251–292. Springer-Verlag, Berlin, Germany, 1995.Google Scholar
  14. 14.
    G. Smolka. An Oz primer. DFKI Oz documentation series, German Research Center for Artificial Intelligence (DFKI), Stuhlsatzenhausweg 3, D-66123 Saarbrücken, Germany, 1995.Google Scholar
  15. 15.
    G. Smolka. The Oz programming model. In J. van Leeuwen, editor, Current Trends in Computer Science, Lecture Notes in Computer Science, vol. 1000. Springer-Verlag, Berlin, Germany, 1995. To appear.Google Scholar
  16. 16.
    G. Smolka and R. Treinen, editors. DFKI Oz Documentation Series. German Research Center for Artificial Intelligence (DFKI), Stuhlsatzenhausweg 3, D-66123 Saarbrücken, Germany, 1995.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gert Smolka
    • 1
  1. 1.Programming Systems LabGerman Research Center for Artificial Intelligence (DFKI)SaarbrückenGermany

Personalised recommendations