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Connection establishment for multi-party real-time communication

  • R. Bettati
  • D. Ferrari
  • A. Gupta
  • W. Heffner
  • W. Howe
  • M. Moran
  • Q. Nguyen
  • R. Yavatkar
Session VII: Multicasting
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 1018)

Abstract

There is considerable interest in the network community in supporting real-time multi-party applications, such as video conferencing. The Tenet Group at UC Berkeley and ICSI has designed and implemented protocols that provide quality of service (QoS) guarantees for real-time traffic on packet switching networks. Suite 2 of the Tenet protocols provides scalable, flexible and efficient network support for real-time multi-party connections. We outline our method of connection establishment and describe the design issues and alternatives, and our decisions. Preliminary measurements confirm the viability of our approach for realtime multicast connection establishment.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. Bettati
    • 1
    • 2
  • D. Ferrari
    • 1
    • 2
  • A. Gupta
    • 1
    • 2
  • W. Heffner
    • 1
    • 2
  • W. Howe
    • 1
    • 2
  • M. Moran
    • 1
    • 2
  • Q. Nguyen
    • 1
    • 2
  • R. Yavatkar
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.The Tenet GroupUniversity of CaliforniaBerkeley
  2. 2.International Computer Science InstituteUSA

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