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Towards a reference framework for process concepts

  • Reidar Conradi
  • Christer Fernström
  • Alfonso Fuggetta
  • Robert Snowdon
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 635)

Abstract

This paper discusses the importance of process support for business activities. A reference framework for process concepts and technology support is sought. The general requirements and properties of the process domain are first discussed. Then, four process sub-models are presented to describe activities, products, tools and organisations, respectively. Five process model phases are also introduced, as well as meta-processes and related human roles to handle process models and their transformations. The process concepts are applied to a bank example.

Keywords

(software) process process modeling process improvement meta-process roles 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Reidar Conradi
    • 1
  • Christer Fernström
    • 2
  • Alfonso Fuggetta
    • 3
  • Robert Snowdon
    • 4
  1. 1.Division of Computer Systems and TelematicsNorwegian Institute of Technology-NTHTrondheimNorway
  2. 2.CAP Gemini InnovationMeylanFrance
  3. 3.CEFRIEL-Politecnico di MilanoMilanoItaly
  4. 4.Dept. of Computer ScienceUniv. of ManchesterManchesterUK

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