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Acquiring object-knowledge for learning systems

  • Luc De Raedt
  • Johan Feyaerts
  • Maurice Bruynooghe
Part 4: Theorem Proving And EBL
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 482)

Abstract

A novel approach to interactively acquire knowledge about new objects in a logic environment is presented. When the user supplies an unknown fact containing unknown objects (constants), the system will ask interesting membership and existential queries about the objects. The answers to these questions allow the system to update its knowledge base. Two basic strategies are implemented: one that examines existing Horn-Clauses for the predicate and another one that uses types. Furthermore, a powerful heuristic, based on analogy, to pose the most interesting questions first is presented.

Keywords

learning by being told knowledge acquisition analogy concept-learning 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Luc De Raedt
    • 1
  • Johan Feyaerts
    • 1
  • Maurice Bruynooghe
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Computer ScienceKatholieke Universiteit LeuvenHeverleeBelgium

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