Skip to main content

Pig as Best Source for Clinical Xenotransplantation

  • Chapter
  • First Online:
Glycoimmunology in Xenotransplantation
  • 82 Accesses

Abstract

Numerous patients in each country need their life-saving transplants. The current sources required for allogenic or xeno-antigenic transplantation are mainly the organs rather than tissues and cells. As mentioned earlier, genetically edited and modified pig organs with multiple genes are attracted to solve the issues of donor organ supply and shortage. However, hurdles still include natural antibodies reactive to xenoantigens in human, and therefore, elicited antibodies are the subjects to overcome the failure in current clinical xenotransplantation. Rhesus and cynomologus monkeys are used as models in the preventive rejection of allografts, but the baboon recipient is used for pig organ xenotransplantation [1]. However, for cell xenotransplantation, cynomolgus monkey has been used [2, 3].

This is a preview of subscription content, log in via an institution to check access.

Access this chapter

Subscribe and save

Springer+ Basic
EUR 32.99 /Month
  • Get 10 units per month
  • Download Article/Chapter or Ebook
  • 1 Unit = 1 Article or 1 Chapter
  • Cancel anytime
Subscribe now

Buy Now

Chapter
USD 29.95
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • Available as PDF
  • Read on any device
  • Instant download
  • Own it forever
eBook
USD 119.00
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • Available as EPUB and PDF
  • Read on any device
  • Instant download
  • Own it forever
Hardcover Book
USD 159.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • Durable hardcover edition
  • Dispatched in 3 to 5 business days
  • Free shipping worldwide - see info

Tax calculation will be finalised at checkout

Purchases are for personal use only

Institutional subscriptions

References

  1. Cooper DK, Satyananda V, Ekser B, van der Windt DJ, Hara H, Ezzelarab MB, et al. Progress in pig-to-non-human primate transplantation models (1998–2013): a comprehensive review of the literature. Xenotransplantation. 2014;21:397–419.

    Article  PubMed  PubMed Central  Google Scholar 

  2. Ekser B, Ezzelarab M, Hara H, van der Windt DJ, Wijkstrom M, Bottino R, et al. Clinical xenotransplantation: the next medical revolution? Lancet. 2012;379:672–83.

    Article  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  3. van der Windt DJ, Bottino R, Kumar G, Wijkstrom M, Hara H, Ezzelarab M, et al. Clinical islet xenotransplantation: how close are we? Diabetes. 2012;61:3046–55.

    Article  PubMed  PubMed Central  Google Scholar 

  4. Carter DB, Lai L, Park KW, Samuel M, Lattimer JC, Jordan KR, Estes DM, Besch-Williford C, Prather RS. Prather phenotyping of transgenic cloned piglets. Cloning Stem Cells. 2002;4:131–45.

    Article  CAS  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  5. Rogers CS, Stoltz DA, Meyerholz DK, Ostedgaard LS, Rokhlina T, Taft PJ, Rogan MP, Pezzulo AA, Karp PH, Itani OA. Disruption of the CFTR gene produces a model of cystic fibrosis in newborn pigs. Science. 2008;321:1837–41.

    Article  CAS  PubMed  PubMed Central  Google Scholar 

  6. Cooper DK, Gollackner B, Sachs DH. Will the pig solve the transplantation backlog? Annu Rev Med. 2002;53:133–47.

    Article  CAS  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  7. Ekser B, Ezzelarab M, Hara H, et al. Clinical xenotransplantation: the next medical revolution? Lancet. 2012;379:672–83.

    Article  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  8. Ibrahim Z, Busch J, Awwad M, Wagner R, Wells K, Cooper DK. Selected physiologic compatibilities and incompatibilities between human and porcine organ systems. Xenotransplantation. 2006;13:488–99.

    Article  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  9. Ekser B, Markmann JF, Tector AJ. Current status of pig liver xenotransplantation. Int J Surg. 2015;23(Pt B):240–6.

    Article  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  10. Aigner B, Renner S, Kessler B, Klymiuk N, Kurome M, Wünsch A, Wolf E. Transgenic pigs as models for translational biomedical research. J Mol Med. 2010;88:653–64.

    Article  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  11. Byrne GW, McGregor CG, Breimer ME. Recent investigations into pig antigen and anti-pig antibody expression. Int J Surg. 2015;23(Pt B):223–8.

    Article  PubMed  PubMed Central  Google Scholar 

  12. Estrada JL, Martens G, Li P, et al. Evaluation of human and non-human primate antibody binding to pig cells lacking GGTA1/CMAH/beta4GalNT2 genes. Xenotransplantation. 2015;22(3):194–202.

    Article  PubMed  PubMed Central  Google Scholar 

  13. Niemann H, Petersen B. The production of multi-transgenic pigs: update and perspectives for xenotransplantation. Transgenic Res. 2016;25(3):361–74. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11248-016-9934-8.

    Article  CAS  PubMed  Google Scholar 

Download references

Author information

Authors and Affiliations

Authors

Rights and permissions

Reprints and permissions

Copyright information

© 2024 The Author(s), under exclusive license to Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd.

About this chapter

Check for updates. Verify currency and authenticity via CrossMark

Cite this chapter

Kim, CH. (2024). Pig as Best Source for Clinical Xenotransplantation. In: Glycoimmunology in Xenotransplantation. Springer, Singapore. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-99-7691-1_3

Download citation

Publish with us

Policies and ethics