Designing Mobile and Ubiquitous Games and Playful Interactions

Chapter
Part of the Gaming Media and Social Effects book series (GMSE)

Abstract

Marshall McLuhan famously said in his 1964 book The Medium is the Message, We become what we behold. We shape our tools, and thereafter our tools shape us. In a relatively short time, video games have become a major feature of our cultural landscape that extend beyond the games themselves such that their aesthetic, iconography and operation are being reflected in the other more established forms of media: film, books and television. This chapter explores the rapidly growing field of mobile and the often associated field of ubiquitous games which are contributing significantly to the cultural spread of games by: opening up new markets, facilitating new player demographics and creating exciting new forms of game play, which will undoubtedly have a significant impact on future society.

Keywords

Game Design Play Interaction Mobile Ubiquitous Sensors 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Singapore 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.ImaginationLancaster, Lancaster Institute for the Contemporary Arts LICA BuildingLancaster UniversityLancasterUK

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